Schubert Center for Child Studies

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Schubert Center Turns 20!

Date posted: August 16th, 2017

In celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University, the Center is convening individuals committed to child well-being in order to promote healthy child and adolescent development by exploring the context of how children grow up. …Read more.

Police Car Lights by Scott Davidson
Police Car Lights by Scott Davidson

Statement on Use of Force

Date posted: August 10th, 2017

The Schubert Center supports developmentally-informed police practices and the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s statement on Use of Force…”Law enforcement officers are trained to treat all individuals, whether they are a complainant, suspect, or defendant, with dignity and respect. This is the bedrock principle behind the concepts of procedural justice and police legitimacy.”

 

Schubert Center Statement on Immigrant and Refugee Children and Youth

Date posted: February 20th, 2017

The Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University  is committed to the well-being of all children and young people, and to promoting an equitable environment in which all children can thrive regardless of their country of origin, race, gender, or religion.

Far too often in human history the world has stood by as one group or another was singled out and deprived of their rights, dignity, well-being, and even survival. This has never been a proud moment for humanity. We deplore all policies and actions that threaten the well-being of children and young people, their families and communities and promote injustice and discrimination.

We stand firmly with immigrant and refugee children and their families and communities.

A Citizen’s Guide to the Cleveland Police Consent Decree with a Special Focus on Implications for Children & Young People

Date posted: February 14th, 2017

The Schubert Center supports advancing positive interactions between youth and police and promotes developmentally informed policies and practices. This guide was created to help the Cleveland community – and specifically young people – better understand the consent decree involving the CLE police. The Citizen’s Guide can be downloaded here.

Lisa Damour Joins Schubert Center as Senior Advisor

Date posted: January 23rd, 2017

The Schubert Center is pleased to announce that Faculty Associate Lisa Damour, PhD, will be joining the center as a Senior Advisor effective immediately. Author of the New York Times bestseller, Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood, Damour directs Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls, writes a column for the New York Times’ Well Family online report, serves as a regular contributor to CBS News, maintains a private psychotherapy practice and consults and speaks internationally. …Read more.

The Ohio Supreme Court Rules Mandatory Transfer of Juveniles to Adult Courts as Unconstitutional

Date posted: January 3rd, 2017

On January 11, 2016, the Schubert Center, with the assistance of faculty associate Jessie Hill, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Judge Ben C. Green Professor of Law at the CWRU School of Law, joined several other organizations with the Children’s Law Center in submitting an amicus or “friend of the court” brief to the Ohio Supreme Court in support of eliminating mandatory bindover of youth (State of Ohio v. Matthew Aalim). More information about the brief can be read here.

On December 22, 2016, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that “mandatory transfer of juveniles to the common pleas courts violates juveniles’ right to due process as guaranteed by the Ohio Constitution.” To read more about the ruling visit the Court News Ohio website.

New Ohio Law on Truancy and School Discipline

Date posted: December 10th, 2016

A new Ohio law on school truancy and discipline was signed by Governor Kasich on January 4, 2016 after being passed by the Ohio Senate on December 8, 2016.While the school discipline amendments that the Schubert Center supported were not included in the final version of the bill, the bill’s passage was still a victory for decriminalizing truancy and improving school discipline. The final bill calls for the State Board of Education to develop a model policy for violent, disruptive, or inappropriate behavior, including excessive absences, that stresses preventative strategies and alternatives to suspension or expulsion. This model policy should then be distributed to each school and school district. Read more about this bill here. 

Annual Report 2015-2016: All Our Children Thriving

Date posted: September 1st, 2016

The Schubert Center’s 2015-2016 annual report, All Our Children Thriving, highlights activities and accomplishments of the center as we work to bridge research, practice, policy and education. Download a printable version here. …Read more.

Gault @ 50

Date posted: August 12th, 2016

The National Juvenile Defender Center released a report called “Defend Children: A Blueprint for Effective Juvenile Defender Services.” The report can be accessed here. NPR covered the release and the full NPR story can be viewed here. Check out more on a year of action in support of juveniles’ right to counsel as we approach the 50th anniversary of In re Gault.

Westside Community House Research Project

Date posted: June 13th, 2016

 
How Do We Help Parents Make Lasting Change? The Westside Community House (WSCH) Wrap for Success program is designed to facilitate and increase social activity and support among parents who partake in West Side Community House’s parenting classes. …Read more.

Kids Love Musicals! Research Project

Date posted: June 7th, 2016

Why is musical theater such a powerful medium through which children and adults find pleasure and a desire to engage in? Does musical theater experience help children with special needs develop socioemotional skills? …Read more.

Ohio Supreme Court Limits Shackling on Juveniles

Date posted: April 4th, 2016

On March 28, the Supreme Court of Ohio announced new rules for limiting the use of shackling in courts for children under 18. The rule creates the presumption that physical restraint will not be used unless the judge supervising the case believes there is a safety threat or a flight risk. …Read more.

Page last modified: May 26, 2016