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Special Issue of Child Development Highlights Research on Immigrant Children

Posted on September 19, 2012

Photo of naturalization ceremony held at the Grand Canyon, by Grand Canyon NPS.

The September 2012 issue of Child Development includes a special section featuring research about immigrant children and the children of immigrants. The section includes fifteen articles ranging in topics from acculturation and family roles among Mexican American adolescents to religious transmission among Moroccan-Dutch adolescents and their parents.

Several of the findings highlighted in the issue have important policy implications. An article by Suet-Ling Pong and Nancy S. Landale found that parents’ education level prior to immigration is the most important factor in their children’s achievement. A study by Christia Spears Brown and Hui Chu determined that school’s promotion of multiculturalism and teachers’ attitudes about diversity had a significant impact on Latino immigrant children’s perception of discrimination and development of positive ethnic identities.

The work of Ariel Kalil, PhD, professor at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago, was also featured in the issue. Kalil will be giving a lecture, titled “The Long Reach of Early Childhood Poverty,” this March as part of the Schubert Center Conversation Series. Her article in Child Development examines the impact of parents’ precarious immigration status on the health of their low-income, American-born children.

Read Child Development (subscription may be required).

Read ScienceDaily’s coverage of the study co-authored by Kalil.

Read ScienceDaily’s coverage of a study finding that children of immigrants and children who immigrate at an early age may have better academic and behavioral outcomes than native-born Americans.

Read ScienceDaily’s coverage of a study finding that immigrant parents’ education before migrating is the strongest predictor for their children’s academic achievement.

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